De Hoek Country Hotel,a quintessential destination in Magaliesberg

It has been 6 years since I last crossed this bridge,
that leads visitors to the main reception area
The weight limit is 3 tons…not a problem for guests when they arrive.
But after the food on offer, they might have a problem leaving.

For more about the food:

The crown on the room key can be found in many incarnations in and around the property.

The guest book is old school and reflects the nature of what De Hoek has to offer.

Guests are taken back to a time where service excellence was paramount,

and every need was catered to.


The general style of the public spaces is that of a country lodge.
Comfortable chairs and sofas abound and corners of a larger space
are arranged to form cosy enclaves where business can be done,
or intimate conversations can be enjoyed


Although there is a library on the upper floor of the main building,
piles of reading material can be found in many of the public rooms


The original sandstone house was constructed in 1991,
but given the way that the Lesotho stone has weathered and aged,
the building seems much older.
The building is a haven of recycled and re-purposed materials.
The exposed wooden struts come from headgear at the (now defunct) Crown Mines.
And the door lintels are from the Durban Station.


This is the view from the North Quarter accommodation,
looking towards the main building.
The gardens are beautifully maintained,
and are home to a plethora of bird species and wildlife.


This Woodland Kingfisher is just one of the many bird species
that can be found on the property.


And speaking of wildlife…
Is this a bird-bath or a cat-feeder?
Even though there was a supply of ground level water,
this moggie decided to jump up to drink the water in this feature


Each room has a stuffed toy of some description on the bed.
Rabbits, teddy bears, frogs and rhinos
are just some of the “species” represented.
If you have formed a bond, they are available to be purchased


Dark wood and plain furnishing are the hallmark of the original accommodation.
Think “Downton Abby”…and I kept expecting to see Maggie Smith.
Given the fact that most travellers like to post about their travels,
 there is complimentary Wi-Fi throughout the hotel.


The Compass Bar.
This is where many of the guests meet before going through to dinner.


I bet that you have never seen a rose constructed out of Pringles?
Also on offer, popcorn, peanuts (in their shells), biltong and dried wors.
All of this and STILL dinner to be savoured.


The regular dining room tables are set beautifully.
In amongst the cutlery I found a fish knife…
something that is not seen in daily use much anymore


I think that I could term this a “TV room”
 as there is a large flat screen hidden in a cupboard.
It can also be used for meeting,
or perhaps even an intimate dinner.


One of my favourite corners.
This haven can be found in the main reception area


Although it rained for most of my visit,
it was warm enough to almost tempt me to get in.


Have you played lawn croquet?
It looks genteel and “from-the-colonies”,
but is is anything but.
When played correctly, it can almost rival any contact sport.


This is the new side of De Hoek.
Instead of trying to make the new match the old,
the architects went the exact opposite and the new “wing” is very modern.
Clean lines and muted colours are the norm.
The Bridge Bistro has stacking glass doors that allow the entire frontage to vanish.
I would really like a home designed like this…with a sea view!

This is Suite 11, the penthouse!

Accommodation that I could easily live in, permanently…

It consists of a kitchen area, balcony, lounge/dining-room, dressing room

as well as a bedroom, bathroom and separate toilet.

Each area can be closed off using a sliding door, 

which gives the occupants privacy should they have guests 

or wish to have a meeting in the lounge. 


Looking down on the gardens from the penthouse.
The last time I visited, I found rabbits in these gardens…but nothing this time.


As if there was not enough to eat…
I discovered this jar of honeycomb on the table in the main building.
Despite my better judgement, I decided to partake
and the taste took me back to my youth when we were able to buy this treat
in bags from a local chocolate manufacturer in my home town.
That being said, I did have a choice of nuts, dried fruit and apples
as an alternative snack.

This is Henry Sisya, the Assistant GM.

He has been with the hotel for 20 years, and is as iconic as the property itself.

He started off as a gardener and has working in every department, thus having an expert knowledge of what is on offer.

Although he now finds himself in a suit and tie, he can be found “front and centre” when there is work to be done.

To find out more about this very special hotel, visit their website: http://dehoek.com

Source: www.davidbatzofin.com